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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Richard Ha Posted - 09/21/2008 : 09:51:32
http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak_oil

Above is the clearest, easiest to understand explanation of Peak Oil I have seen to date. The world has changed and many people donít know it, yet. But, we have to be wise and resolute. We have no time to waste.

It is not only that oil supply will not be able to keep up with demand. It is also that natural resources are finite. World population is forecast to double in forty years. http://www.chrismartenson.com/environmental_data.
That means food and everything dependent on petroleum and mined products will be increasing in price. And, the resource will go to the highest bidder. Others will starve, if they donít find a solution. On the Big Island we have alternatives at hand. We just cannot squander it.

That being the case, we do not have the luxury to be picky about opportunity that come our way.

1- We cannot give up on GMO research. The Irish would have appreciated a GMO potato to help them prevent the famine. Now we need to think in terms of how we are going to feed all our people. It is my opinion that without imported fertilizer we have more people than we can feed. Without some help from science, we will not be able to feed everyone. I am a farmer. I know about growing food.
2- We cannot give up on the Thirty Meter Telescope. It is a billion dollar construction project over 8-9 years, employing 300 people. After buildout it will employ 120 or so peopleómostly local. There will be a benefits package that will consist of an annual contribution toward education of our keiki. And, there will be much more benefits to education for our keiki. If we tried we cannot develop a business that will give us these kinds of benefits. We would be foolish to turn it away. I am part Hawaiian. And of course, at a minimum we need to take care of the environment and the culture. But, many Hawaiians and other residents of the Big Island, prefer to focus our energy on solutions. It is not about us anymore. It is about future generations.
3- We need to develop Geothermal energy. It is base power and if located at diverse places on our island, is dependable and proven. It has very good net energy characteristics. By contrast, bio fuels is spinning wheels. The net energy is terrible and in our Big Island conditions may even be negative. And, it is farming. Oil at $200 per barrel is the equal of 70 cents per pound. Farmers feel that it may take at least four pounds of product to be able to squeeze out one pound of oil, so farmers cannot see themselves getting paid more than 18 cents per pound to farm bio fuels. Farmers will not farm biofuels for 18 cents per pound!!

Net energy is what gives us our lifestyle. But, it is increasingly taking more energy to get energy. Our living standard will decline, unless we get energy from an unlimited resource. http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak-oil-b.
Geothermal is proven and stable. We should plan on using more electric motors to help us do our work? The more successful we are in incorporating electricity, the more we can maintain our lifestyle.

The world has changed. http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak-oil-c.
Civilizations come and go. But, we have the ability to adapt in a smart timely way. Not, no can. CAN!!

15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Damon Posted - 03/04/2009 : 10:20:14
The hearings have begun and the Tweets have started flowing. Thelma got there late and just started her feed. The updates come in about every 20-30 minutes live from the legislature.

I sure wish neighbor islands wouldn't get shortchanged on the TV coverage. It's being broadcast live on Oahu!

Damon Tucker's Weblog
esnap Posted - 03/04/2009 : 04:36:14
As far as the "Population Explosion" goes:
quote:
The Population Bomb (1968) is a book written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.


There are many factors which will dampen population growth.

Damon Posted - 03/03/2009 : 23:45:06
Big Hearings tomorrow.

I have set up two feeds on my blog to follow the hearings live. I will expand the feeds to 5 20 threads once the hearings begin.

Damon Tucker's Weblog
Rob Tucker Posted - 09/27/2008 : 10:44:48
Thank you Jay. And I was asking this of everyone... not just you....
JWFITZ Posted - 09/27/2008 : 10:01:00
Touche,

That is a worthy question and one deserving of an answer.

And here is is: it depends.

What it depends on is whether or not I can convince myself that the net good to the community that I can personally generate by being actively involved in some process towards banning non-food crops or any other such process overweighs the lack of attention that I must suffer in other aspects of my life. We all have finite time and finite resources. As well, some are more effective in some manners of expending those resources than others. Diplomacy is not my forte.

At this point I don't see that panning out. I've got taro to plant, both to feed myself and likely my neighbors, and that's a full time project.

I really do believe that direct personal action in demonstrating effective and sensible ways of living an ecologically benign and non-materialist lifestyle in a fair and not-agenda driven manner is perhaps the MOST important task anyone could take on--and for some reason there's very few out there doing just this-- at least in a meaningful manner. If we had more of THIS sort of thing delivered in a convincing manner, I expect most of these other issues that require advocacy would evaporate.

So, honestly, I think it's simply an admission of where I think the pressure I can apply for a better future does the most good. I'm convinced it's primarily in altering the way I personally live, and then inviting and aiding others to do the same.
Rob Tucker Posted - 09/27/2008 : 09:33:26
On this subject the selection of our mayor is of vital importance. Who will be making these these decisions the community or the few?

So when you make statements like "I would support that" just what do you mean? How will you support it? Theoretically? Abstractly?
gtill Posted - 09/27/2008 : 08:35:26
Must also consider that if this new ag (fuel crops) is brought in, will they get a guaranteed price from the state? This would close the door to cheaper imports, and Kapu much of the land. They will set the price at the present greatly inflated levels, which will be the norm with no chance of lowering same by importing cheaper foreign oil(meaning ethanol & bioD). Already happening on the mainland with Brazillian sugar crops, no cheaper imports till the US crop is sold off at their own price(+subsidies).
JWFITZ Posted - 09/27/2008 : 08:12:33
I could easily be talked into support that.

Maybe some of the commercial farmers here can inform the conversation, but there is a real crisis brewing that bodes for very high food prices next year. Commercial farming has been dependent on credit for years, and at the moment, of course, credit is very tight. At the time in which fertilizers and such are at record high prices--worldwide demand for urea is down, and not because it's not needed. It's simply not being purchased because farmers cannot afford to do so, nor get the credit extended to them to do so.
gtill Posted - 09/26/2008 : 18:25:37
Mabe it's time to ban non food crops, If sugar gets in with state support, goodby any hope of growing food. Plus no state funds to help the new land grabs. Ban all non food crops!
bodysurf Posted - 09/26/2008 : 17:48:39
gmo crops have been shown to produce 10% less anyways...they won't save anyone..and hawaiians had hundreds of varieties of kalo created without the help of biotech....why give up control of your food to corporate control?
Damon Posted - 09/25/2008 : 07:32:59
The ANTI-GMO bill passed another reading yesterday.

It is my understanding the Coffee Farmers were very under represented at the meetings while the Taro Farmers were still plugging away.

It's on the front of today's tribune that has not been posted online yet.

-------
General Election Unofficial Poll
Rob Tucker Posted - 09/25/2008 : 07:13:21
Exactly and precisely.
JWFITZ Posted - 09/25/2008 : 07:02:59
It is nothing less than a crisis. With every baby born, the crisis is worse, and with every square foot of food producing land going to development or non-foodstuff production, the crisis is worse.
Rob Tucker Posted - 09/25/2008 : 06:54:07
Bottom line is if we are a world population of 6 billion heading for 12 billion and then that 12 billion is heading for 24 billion then when does the world recognize the futility of the math?

China, in two generations, went from the epitome of destitution to top of the economic heap. They did this by controlling their population first.

As for gtill's point about immigrants: The US has always been a nation of immigrants. Nothing has changed. We are still one of the least populated nations but, unfortunately have the highest rate of resource consumption. And the Big Island is, for practical terms, the least populated of the Hawaiian islands.... fortunate are we. Now if we can steer our way to a higher level of sustainability we will do better than most.

gtill Posted - 09/25/2008 : 06:31:21
I believe in the US we have zpg'd ourselves right out of a workforce, hence the flow of immigrants who seem bent on making up for our lack of population expansion.

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