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 Planting in Hawaiian acres
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canistel
Newbie

39 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2010 :  04:34:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is my first post so thanks to any replies
I purchased vacant land in the lower section of Hawaiian acres
It's about 1000ft in elevation.My plan is to come over and plant
fruit,spice,olive,palm.and sandalwood trees.Also flowering gingers.
Then return to the mainland.I will prepare them for
my absence by clearing around them and laying cardboard to prevent
overgrowing of weeds.I believe there will be adequate watering for
rain.I plan on coming once a year for approx 5 year till I move
on a permanent basis.
I am asking if this plan is a good idea? I know pigs could come
and have a feast.Any experienced comments greatly appreciated
TIA

Wegian
malihini

USA
75 Posts

Posted - 11/07/2010 :  03:38:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello canistel.

We also have property in Hawaiian Acres. Like you, we do not live here yet, but we already planted some trees so that they have a chance to grow a bit before we make the move. So far, we have had no issues with insufficient rain. Insufficient soil seems to be the challenge.

We only have about a dozen trees planted at this time. We build a circle with lava rocks and fill the area with soil purchased in bags from Wal-mart or Home Depot. The trees get planted in the circles of dirt. After a couple of visits where a considerable amount of time was spent clearing the weeds from around the new trees, we learned to use the soil bags as weed block by placing them on the ground around the new plants. (The bags are ugly, be we arenít there to see them!) The weeds still come up around the new plantings, but the bags give the new plants a little space and make it a little easier to find the things you planted on your next visit.

We only clear a space for the trees that we are planting. You would be amazed at the number and variety of weeds that pop up in the cleared areas. We leave the rest of the grounds covered in Uluhe, Ohia, and Hapuíu. Uluhe have a way of making it tough for intruding species to get a start.

I suggest that you page through this forum as it contains a remarkable amount of information covering all aspects of living and growing things in the Puna area. I am grateful to those who have shared what they know on this forum.

We wish you the best of luck and look forward to meeting you some day.



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canistel
Newbie

39 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2010 :  14:04:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks for the reply
You mentioned lack of topsoil,I'll have to check that out.
I am planning on using dolomite to enhance good ph
As far as digging,was an auger needed? I want to keep the natural
foliage as much as possible.Just marry a good mix.I've read Sandalwood needs other tree roots to live healthy.Are there any
plants to avoid for fragileness.Since I'll be letting thrive on their
own.Also anything that could be a takeover plant to avoid Has anybody
grown any spices(cardamon/nutmeg/star anise)? how about Kalamata
olives? Also mangoes@1000ft is this too high? As a summer farmer/
indoor plant lover I'm excited to grow thing that are not possible
here in Oregon.One more how about Eggfruit@1000ft? I love those
sauted w/ eggs and suchi rice is the best. You are right there are
volumes of good info on this site.I too look forward to seeing you in the future.


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d96778
Da Kine

106 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2010 :  16:05:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aloha Canistel & Welcome!

I agree that there is so much valuable information here on the how-to's of planting in various areas. Almost any question you would have on gardening has been covered in this forum.

Where in Oregon do you hang your hat? We are part-timers in Pahoa & Oregon, too. Just curious.....have found that several PunaWebbers are originally from Oregon, or are still there, like us.

Dee
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leilaniguy
Kamaaina

USA
741 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2010 :  09:01:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aloha from another ex-Oregonian. I lived at the end of 8 road in Hawaiian Acres in 1991-92, now live in Leilani at about the same elevation. You can grow just about anything you mentioned though it may be too wet for olives, not sure. There are many things you might regret planting. You can find out which ones at www.hear.org Chances are if you see large patches of anything growing wild along the roads here, even if it's gorgeous, it's not something you'd want in your yard.
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Radiopeg
Kamaaina

USA
566 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2010 :  15:09:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by leilaniguy

There are many things you might regret planting. You can find out which ones at www.hear.org

Wow, lots of information there. Thanks for that link. I'm sure I'll have to carry around a printout when I start shopping. We did finally get an accepted offer on a lot in Eden Roc. It has good neighbors and some ornamentals and fruit trees planted. We will be also visiting during the years until we can sell our home in WA.

Life goes on, with you or without you.
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canistel
Newbie

39 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2010 :  16:53:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the replies
1)I'm from Portland

2) thanks for the Hear link and my place is very close to
where you lived I'm down on 6 by G Do you really think
mangoes would grow there? Were there many pigs back at that
time?

Paul
ps I can't wait for January to go
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MarkP
Kamaaina

863 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2010 :  17:57:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We are talking solid rock here. A hand operated auger could kill you when it jams in the rock, and if you are starting on an exposed sheet of pahoehoe the auger will just skitter around without cuttiing. Some people use a jackhammer, either hand operated or mounted on an excavator. There are areas with deep soil in Puna but I think most of Hawaiian Acres has pahoehoe very close to the surface.
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dobanion
malihini

USA
80 Posts

Posted - 11/11/2010 :  05:29:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow...didn't realize the entire city of Portland was attempting to empty itself into Puna. ;)

Yes, I'm a Portlander too.

Waiting on closing on a lot down by Naalehu.

Back to topic....somewhat....where is the deep soil in Puna anyway? In the week I spent there, poking around in Fern Forest, Eden Roc, Hawaiian Acres, Ainaloa, and Nanawale, I didn't get any deeper than about 8" of soil. Most were like 4".
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MarkP
Kamaaina

863 Posts

Posted - 11/11/2010 :  08:44:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
South Kopua Rd is the road that takes you down to Eden Roc. In the upper stretch it runs through old pasture land and former cane fields. I stopped to talk story with a fellow who is building a house there, and asked how he had installed the posts for his gate. With a manual post hole digger, he replied. Amazing. Several feet down with a glorified trowel, while I, a couple of miles further down, nearly knocked loose teeth the first time I tried to drive the point of an o'o into the ground. It penetrated maybe an inch and a tiny cloud of rock dust came up. My acquaintance laughed when he heard that and replied that my 1" of soil was probably healthier than his 5' of soil since it had not been farmed on an industrial scale to the point of death as his had.
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leilaniguy
Kamaaina

USA
741 Posts

Posted - 11/11/2010 :  10:48:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are mango trees in the Acres but production can be iffy, mostly because hard rain or high wind during blossom time can destroy all the flowers in a few minutes. Regarding that deep soil on Kapua and the other roads leading to the subdivisions south of HWY 11, the deep soil is on Mauna Kea- Mauna Loa, both older volcanoes. When you get to the low spot in the road, the "Puna river", you cross onto Kilauea lava that is just a few hundred years old. If you have Pahoehoe the easiest way to deal with it is to plant on top of it. Just take the tree out of the pot, set it where you want it, and dump cinder-soil mix around it 'til it's well covered. The tree roots always seem to find their way through the Pahoehoe.
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rasman
Da Kine

106 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2010 :  14:07:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aloha Canistel- Welcome, I too have land in "the Acres". I actually have neighbors who live off-island and only visit about once a year. They too have done many plantings, mostly fruit trees. I strongly urge you to use organic methods so as not to further contaminate our precious aina and its water supply. Your thinking on using cardboard mulch is much more desirable than plastic bags which will only photo degrade and further pollute the land with petro-chemicals.

You can maintain tree and shrub plantings with minimal maintenance, however the more initial work you put in, the better. Getting local soils and mulch material trucked in will be better than buying by the bag if you plan on doing any serious ag. The use of a chipper/shredder can also give you free mulch for your return visit(it should sit a while) at no cost (minus the rental cost).

The time of year you plan on visiting should be coordinated with the time your trees may need the most attention e.g.: dryer months when supplemental watering may be needed.

I think you may be a little higher than 1k feet, but I could be wrong, however you can still grow an incredible amount of fruit at your location/elevation, but mangoes do have trouble there, not so much from elevation as from heavy rains during flowering. Coconuts as well are not too viable (as far as fruiting goes), but I have seen some bearing trees even higher than you. Eggfruit should do well, however true sandalwood's success will be related to the layout of your land as well as the tree density on your land. Do you have lots of preferably larger Ohias or are you on one of those lots with mostly Uluhe (stick fern) and tibouchina bushes (abundant bushes with purple flowers) etc.?

Although there is no substitute for experience, good planning and lots of prep work will be you best friend. Don't skimp on the hole for the trees. Give the roots lots of room and lots of organic material and you will have a great chance at success.

PS. Many spices will grow well here, but for many your location may get too wet and need some type of cover. Allspice trees however grow almost effortlessly. God bless in whatever your venture-Aloha




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canistel
Newbie

39 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2010 :  07:00:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for everyones advice and experience sharing

Can't wait for the end of January to vist.Btw it's 37 in Ptown

as I type this.Has there been enough of a drought at higher levels

to effect adequate rain watering? Also enough for Catchment?

Paul



Mild weather across the majority of Alaska contrasted with chilly conditions in the southwestern part of the state. Meanwhile, mostly dry weather prevailed in western Alaska, while wet conditions affected southeastern areas. During the first 13 days of November, precipitation totaled 6.19 inches (241 percent of normal) in Juneau, while 15.74 inches soaked Pelican. Farther south, mostly dry weather returned to Hawaii, following recent, drought-easing rainfall. On the Big Island, Hilo's month-to-date rainfall of 3.43 inches (52 percent of normal) left its January 1 - November 13 total at 48.77 inches (46 percent).
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leilaniguy
Kamaaina

USA
741 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2010 :  13:45:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

It's about as wet there as here at the top of Leilani and we've been getting 1/8 to 3 inches nearly every day for weeks. I've only had to buy water because of drought once in the last 11 years. Hilo's rainfall is measured at the airport, so it's kind of misleading. The upper parts of town like Kaumana get much more rain.
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Cagary
Da Kine

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2010 :  16:24:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by canistel

Thanks for everyones advice and experience sharing

Can't wait for the end of January to vist.Btw it's 37 in Ptown

as I type this.Has there been enough of a drought at higher levels

to effect adequate rain watering? Also enough for Catchment?

Paul



Mild weather across the majority of Alaska contrasted with chilly conditions in the southwestern part of the state. Meanwhile, mostly dry weather prevailed in western Alaska, while wet conditions affected southeastern areas. During the first 13 days of November, precipitation totaled 6.19 inches (241 percent of normal) in Juneau, while 15.74 inches soaked Pelican. Farther south, mostly dry weather returned to Hawaii, following recent, drought-easing rainfall. On the Big Island, Hilo's month-to-date rainfall of 3.43 inches (52 percent of normal) left its January 1 - November 13 total at 48.77 inches (46 percent).




Where are you getting your readings from? (not doubting you, just curious.)
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alfastatik
Newbie

USA
49 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2010 :  14:07:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aloha Canistel.
My wife and I are on G Rd. and have been planting fruit trees for about 5 years. I'll list some of the most and least productive:

The Best I've seen:

1. Bananas grow like crazy.
2. Narjanilla loves it.
3. Tree Tomato does good.
3. Passion Fruit grows so well it can be a menace (keep it trimmed)
4. Neighbors have succes with various types Avocado.
5. Citrus is good with lime/dolomite treatments and fertilizer.
6. Poha Berry is very prolific
7. Surinam Cherry is a winner.
8. Malabar Chestnut will kickout for a survival nut.
9. Ice Cream Bean, but watch out this will be a monster tree.

The Worst so far:

1. Fig doesn't want to take.
2. Sapodillo is a slow grower. maybe too much water.
3. Coconut, most accounts you won't get fruit d/t elavation/salinity.
4. Cashew I'm having difficulty with.
5. Cacao, I can't seem to keep it alive.

There are dozens which we've planted that have yet to fruit and I'll have to keep them growing and see what happens.

Planting: just make sure things drain so the roots can breath. Cinder-Soil combos work good most of the time.

Anyway the Acres is a great place to grow fruits and vegetables. We've been drier recently which has things growing crazy year round now as opposed to having a waterlogged winter.



Jeffrey Krepps
jevkreppsz@juno.com
Kurtistown, HI
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