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 Farming and Gardening in Puna
 What to to grow on a trellis?
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2019 :  17:02:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The gasses from the eruption killed of our old lilikoi.
I was able to get a couple of cuttings.
Not sure if they'll take, though.

So, I have a trellis left over from the defunct lilikoi, a 16' long x 4-1/2' tall trellis made from 4x8 redwood lattice panels.
my original intention was to plant some kabochas to grow up the trellis.
Now I'm thinking that a 2' x 16' planting area is a lot of kabocha.
I'm considering adding cucumbers to the planting.

Any suggestions for other climbing vine fruit that does well in our climate?


Edited by - 1voyager1 on 05/23/2019 17:03:31

HereOnThePrimalEdge
Punatic

South Sandwich Islands
8299 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2019 :  18:07:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dragonfruit will grow on posts or a strong trellis.

If you want to include vegetables:
Yard long beans
Wing beans & wing peas
Malabar spinach
Tomatoes (indeterminate)
Bitter melon (acquired taste)
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ElysianWort
Punatic

USA
1703 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2019 :  20:28:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chayote squash do very well. So do lima beans.

These are interesting too and do well at my place:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlSEfpFs0Us
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kalianna
Da Kine

374 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2019 :  21:18:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, to all of the above, but why not just plant more lilikoi? They're easy to start and quick to bear.
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2019 :  03:01:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have started a couple of cuttings from the old lilikoi.
How there could have been any living vines I don't know.
There were no living roots on the stump.
The dead lilikoi was at least 10 years old, maybe 15.
It was growing up a couple of ohias when we move in, with fruit hanging in the tops of the trees.
I put the trellis in trying to control it.
it covered the trellis and went up the ohias again.
Half the fruit we got from it was gathered from under the ohias.
If the cuttings survive we'll have lilikoi again, but not in the numbers we were getting them, not for a few years at least.
Everything I'm considering putting there is grown as an annual and will need to be replanted each year.
I'm planning on having the lilikoi back again, hopefully in a tamer version.

M'Lady has very conservative tastes in food stuff.
The yard long beans would probably get her approval.
She likes string beans.
I can tolerate them.
The tomatoes will be done separately in cages.

I do plan on bringing dragon fruit in, but in a different location.
I'll take cuttings from the one down along Red Rd.

Everything else mentioned so far, other than the lima beans and the squash, is not likely to get approval to be brought into the house.

The beans, though, would probably need more room than they'd get on the trellis.



Edited by - 1voyager1 on 05/24/2019 03:05:34
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ElysianWort
Punatic

USA
1703 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2019 :  06:30:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dragonfruit likes to set it's roots into the vertical surface it grows on. So to truly make it happy and fruit prolifically it requires something other than just a metal climbing surface to cling to.
I've seen people do wooden pallets standing on edge and connected together with some of the pallets covered with stapled-on cloth where the roots were to start. The cloth areas were the spots where the farmer added liquid fertilizers. A tall rock wall with lots of cracks works well too.
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HereOnThePrimalEdge
Punatic

South Sandwich Islands
8299 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2019 :  07:47:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
She likes string beans.

There are pole beans that will grow on a trellis that may be closer to her preference. Local seed varieties are available at KTA, Home Depot, Island Naturals, etc. you can order directly from UH too.
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bananahead
Punatic

USA
1163 Posts

Posted - 05/25/2019 :  12:17:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
in Puna... the only good answer is... maile....

then you can propagate by seeds or cuttings and sell 1 gallon 1.5 yr old plants for $20+ ea...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alyxia_stellata

"...Puna and Panaewa
Several lelo noeau from the Hilo and Puna districts on Hawaii Island paint a wonderfully fragrant picture of Puna and Panaewa. Ka makani hali ala o Puna, the fragrance-bearing wind of Puna; Lei Hanakahi i ke ala me ke onaona o Panaewa, Hanakahi is adorned with the fragrance and perfume of Panaewa. These were both places that had a moist climate suitable for maile and other fragrant ferns, as well as the famous hala (Pandanus tectorius) from Puna. The phrase Puna paia ala, fragrant walls of Puna, gives reference to the hinano blossom which was famously hung inside hale of that district to scent the house. People traveled to both Puna and Panaewa in order to pick maile, hence those areas being remembered as fragrant. ..."

~~

******************************************************************
save our indigenous and endemic Hawaiian Plants... learn about them, grow them, and plant them on your property, ....instead of all that invasive non-native garbage I see in most yards... aloha

Edited by - bananahead on 05/25/2019 12:19:20
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ElysianWort
Punatic

USA
1703 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2019 :  09:11:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes maile is wonderful smelling and can be sold for profit but:

1) You can't eat it.

2) It is difficult to grow. I have tried many times.


******************************************************************
save our indigenous and endemic Hawaiian Plants... learn about them, grow them, and plant them on your property, ....instead of all that invasive non-native garbage I see in most yards... aloha


Most of the plant's and trees that people grow to better their lives here on the islands are NOT garbage. You're just plain wrong here with you persistent stubborn mantra.
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2019 :  09:56:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok, I'm back to this again.
I have been fumbling around working my way through getting this going.
While trying to cultivate an area in front of the trellis, I found that a ripped lot is not conducive to tilling a nice deep area of soil.
[It also follows that I won't be using a trencher to bury cables for the new video security system.]
I broke my o'o, a 6' steel San Angelo bar, trying to pry a boulder out.
It smacked me in the forehead, almost cold cocking me, when it broke.
It was time to rethink the project, as soon as my head cleared.

I was down 4 to 6", so I picked up some redwood 2x6's and made a raised bed, filed it with soil, and am now ready to begin planting.
I have decided what will be planted.

16'x 2' is not much growing area, especially for vining types.
Being as this is an experimental project I've decided to stay with vines and have added a musk melon [cantaloupe] and a mini watermelon to the list.
Each 8' section of the raised bed will get 5 items planted:
Cucumber, kabocha, musk melon, watermelon and tomato.

The kabocha, cantaloupe, and watermelon will be started from seed.
The cucumber and tomato will be from HD seedlings.
Today, I'll transplant the cucumber and tomato seedlings, then set the kabocha, cantaloupe, and watermelon seeds.

The Leilani Estates Squash Farm is now operational.
If this works well, I may add another 16' of trellis, doubling the growing area.
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 06/09/2019 :  23:15:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Update:
Simplify your life, plant a vegetable garden, save on your food costs.

As I was planting the seeds for my kabocha - musk melon - watermelon patch, along comes Tubby, our special needs lap cat.
He is delighted as he wanders around the raised bed smelling and looking around at everything.
I can see it allover his face: Oh boy, a new cat latrine.
So, I begin plotting on how to keep cats out of the new garden area.

A day or two later, after finding that something has been eating some of my seeds, I covered the bed with some bird netting I had bought a few years earlier, should keep the birds and cats out.
The next morning I find the netting all tore up with bird feathers scattered around the bed.
Apparently, the birds get in anyway and the cats have a field day chasing the bird inside the netting tearing it up in the process.
So, I pullout some hardware cloth I had bought to make a cage to move cats in for the evacuation, but never used, and begin making a fence around the bed.
And, I buy some more seed for just in case.
And, one of the cats brought a dead rat home that night.
I'm now thinking that I need to protect it from cats, rats and birds.

I didn't finish the fence that day.
Went out to finish it the next morning and I find more bird feathers around the bed.
Maybe the cats are protecting my squash garden.
I'm finding empty kabocha, watermelon and musk melon hulls laying on the ground with no seedlings showing, ... birds and/or rats?

I began looking at motion activated water sprinklers to keep birds, rats and cats out of the garden.
Found a nice one for about $70 that just might do the job.

Finally this afternoon, I see seedlings sprouting out of the ground.
Maybe some of the seed will survive.
I am beginning to wonder just where this is going to end up.





Edited by - 1voyager1 on 06/09/2019 23:26:55
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kalianna
Da Kine

374 Posts

Posted - 06/10/2019 :  00:45:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As I'm sprouting seeds in the garden I cover it with cattle fencing just by laying it on top of the rocks that form the beds. That keeps my neighbor's chickens from scratching up the seeds and eating them. I also hang old dvd disks from tomato cages and that scares the local birds away. Once the seeds sprout the birds lose interest and then I place rocks strategically around the plants to keep the cats from using it as a litter box. Hope that helps.
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ElysianWort
Punatic

USA
1703 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  07:13:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I do my seedlings in a separate area from the garden. A little wire cage surrounding a planting tray and inside the tray lots of little labeled planting cups. After the seedlings grow a few inches then they are ready for transplant and that skips the issue of birds or rats eating the seeds.

As Kaliana said, some rocks surrounding the seedlings solves the issue of the cats digging up the seedlings when using the freshly tilled garden as a new "latrine". Me sitting in a lawn-chair overlooking the garden with a water-hose is another method to give the cats a message. -But you know cats... they do what they want.

Growing melons will present you with a different problem as the fruit mature. The kabocha squash is exempt from this problem because the skin is so thick but as for the others you listed, there is a large fruit-fly that stings them and lays eggs in the melons. A way around that problem is to "bag" your fruit. I've seen cheese cloth, I've seen paper bags, I even once saw someone wrap their cucumbers in newspaper.

Good luck and happy gardening 1v1
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2019 :  11:03:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The raised bed plot is doing quite nicely.
I seemed to have panicked when seeing the seeds being dug up.
I did lose a few, but more than enough are growing and developing.
The cucumbers, begun from HD seedlings, have reached the trellis and have begun to produce female flowers.
Will I need to hand pollinate, or will the local critters take care of that for me?
We do get some honey bees, but not many.

The kabocha are big, strong and look to be healthy, still got a long ways to go before reaching the trellis, though.
Watermelon and musk melon are developing more slowly, but look OK.

EDIT:
The cats seem to have lost interest in the plot.
At first it looked good.
Now it isn't as easy to dig in.
I have only found one cat bomb in the bed.
That was a while ago.

Edited by - 1voyager1 on 06/24/2019 11:09:30
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kalianna
Da Kine

374 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2019 :  19:02:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glad all is going well. i don't fertilize my cukes and get plenty--that is ,when it rains. Went out today and my lemon cukes were fried. :-(
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1voyager1
Kamaaina

USA
829 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2019 :  14:07:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cukes seem to be OK.
Some female flowers are fading and their ovaries are growing, good sign.
I had understood that they put out male flowers to begin with, then female flowers.
They are now producing both male and female flowers.
Fertilization will not be a problem.

I understand that the watermelons will need to be supported while on a trellis.
Using sections of nylons is a recommended method.
May have to send M'Lady to buy me some for the garden.
Might be able to adapt them, maybe, to protect the others if fruit flies become a problem.

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