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Richard Ha
malihini

USA
86 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  09:51:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak_oil

Above is the clearest, easiest to understand explanation of Peak Oil I have seen to date. The world has changed and many people donít know it, yet. But, we have to be wise and resolute. We have no time to waste.

It is not only that oil supply will not be able to keep up with demand. It is also that natural resources are finite. World population is forecast to double in forty years. http://www.chrismartenson.com/environmental_data.
That means food and everything dependent on petroleum and mined products will be increasing in price. And, the resource will go to the highest bidder. Others will starve, if they donít find a solution. On the Big Island we have alternatives at hand. We just cannot squander it.

That being the case, we do not have the luxury to be picky about opportunity that come our way.

1- We cannot give up on GMO research. The Irish would have appreciated a GMO potato to help them prevent the famine. Now we need to think in terms of how we are going to feed all our people. It is my opinion that without imported fertilizer we have more people than we can feed. Without some help from science, we will not be able to feed everyone. I am a farmer. I know about growing food.
2- We cannot give up on the Thirty Meter Telescope. It is a billion dollar construction project over 8-9 years, employing 300 people. After buildout it will employ 120 or so peopleómostly local. There will be a benefits package that will consist of an annual contribution toward education of our keiki. And, there will be much more benefits to education for our keiki. If we tried we cannot develop a business that will give us these kinds of benefits. We would be foolish to turn it away. I am part Hawaiian. And of course, at a minimum we need to take care of the environment and the culture. But, many Hawaiians and other residents of the Big Island, prefer to focus our energy on solutions. It is not about us anymore. It is about future generations.
3- We need to develop Geothermal energy. It is base power and if located at diverse places on our island, is dependable and proven. It has very good net energy characteristics. By contrast, bio fuels is spinning wheels. The net energy is terrible and in our Big Island conditions may even be negative. And, it is farming. Oil at $200 per barrel is the equal of 70 cents per pound. Farmers feel that it may take at least four pounds of product to be able to squeeze out one pound of oil, so farmers cannot see themselves getting paid more than 18 cents per pound to farm bio fuels. Farmers will not farm biofuels for 18 cents per pound!!

Net energy is what gives us our lifestyle. But, it is increasingly taking more energy to get energy. Our living standard will decline, unless we get energy from an unlimited resource. http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak-oil-b.
Geothermal is proven and stable. We should plan on using more electric motors to help us do our work? The more successful we are in incorporating electricity, the more we can maintain our lifestyle.

The world has changed. http://www.chrismartenson.com/peak-oil-c.
Civilizations come and go. But, we have the ability to adapt in a smart timely way. Not, no can. CAN!!

JWFITZ
Punatic

1362 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  09:56:38  Show Profile  Visit JWFITZ's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, that's sensible and practical.
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Damon
Punatic

3738 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  09:56:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome to Punaweb Richard!!!

In case folks don't know it.

Richard is the owner of Hamakua Springs Country Farms.

He also has one of the better blogs on the island:

Ha Ha Ha!

His ohana has been providing food to island residents for decades.

It's an honor to see you post here Richard.

-------
Just a piece of my thinking
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JWFITZ
Punatic

1362 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:00:16  Show Profile  Visit JWFITZ's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Admirable, frankly, and this is the sort of thing we need to see much more of.
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JerryCarr
Punatic

2395 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:04:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for posting here, Mr. Ha. When we recently exchanged emails, I suggested that you post here, and I hope that you continue to share your knowledge and insight with us on this forum.

Cheers and welcome to Punaweb,
Jerry

Edited by - JerryCarr on 09/21/2008 10:05:34
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Richard Ha
malihini

USA
86 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:13:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mahalo for the welcome Rob. Thanks for suggesting Jerry.

I'm sure the majority of the people on the Big Island feel like we all need to pull together. What we are facing will take a strong community. We all need to make more friends and get closer to our families. It is not doom and gloom. We can do this!!

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DickWilson
Kamaaina

USA
766 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:19:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Richard; couldn't agree with you more! We need to become one large community of neighbors all helping each other to make a go of it. Puna has an absolutely incredibly diverse range of skills and experience that can and should be used to make the island one ohana. If we all work together we can do this.

dick wilson
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Richard Ha
malihini

USA
86 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:26:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm sorry Damon. I had to change my password and was communicating with Rob to do that. I just realized I addressed him instead of you. I appreciate all that you said.

I am really impressed that you worked your way through the Hawaii Community College system and then went to on UH Hilo. HCC is open enrollment. It was rated 16th in the nation for giving students opportunity to higher education. A student can just enter and on the basis of hard work can enter the UH system. This is huge!

I know and respect your father-in-law very much. We will be working together in the E Malama 'Aina stustainability festival, Nov 7th and 8th. (emalamaainahawaii.org) The objective is to show people that they are not alone. Many people are doing things to adapt. "You are not alone."

Thanks again, my friend.
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Damon
Punatic

3738 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  10:54:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My F-I-L too looks forward to working at the E Malama Aina Festival.

Just a correction, yes, I went to Hawaii Community College but then transferred to UH Manoa (Not Hilo) because at the time, Hilo did not offer much courses that were in my field of study.

Hope you continue to post to Punaweb (PW)

-------
Just a piece of my thinking
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kani-lehua
Punatic

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  12:13:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
went to the e malama aina site to sign up for "just keep me informed", but don't know if i was actually registered? i tried it once using the security code. after clicking on the submit button, the same code came up? so i tried it again and the same code came up?

"chaos reigns within.
reflect, repent and reboot.
order shall return."

microsoft error message with haiku poetry
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Hilofam
Newbie

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  12:34:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Richard for posting the link. I plan to do the whole crash course now. This should be required viewing for everyone to get a full grip on what is happening on this planet and get things in perspective.

Also thank you for acknowledging Hawaii Community College's role on the Big Island. I am an instructor there and am always happy when Hawaii CC gets recognition!
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Richard Ha
malihini

USA
86 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  13:24:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aloha Kani-Lehua;
You are registered on the E Malama 'Aina website.
Mahalo
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Mitzi M
Da Kine

305 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  14:32:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hold the phone...

The Irish would have benefitted from GMO????????

The disease that caused the 1840's potato famine was so devastating largely because all the potatoes in Ireland descended from just a few individual plants brought there from Peru. The effects of crop failure were intensified by unusually cold winters, a typhus epidemic and a land use system that crippled the poor.

"Jeremy Rifkin, in his book Beyond Beef, writes "The Celtic grazing lands of...Ireland had been used to pasture cows for centuries. The British colonized...the Irish, transforming much of their countryside into an extended grazing land to raise cattle for a hungry consumer market at home.... The British taste for beef had a devastating impact on the impoverished and disenfranchised people of...Ireland.... Pushed off the best pasture land and forced to farm smaller plots of marginal land, the Irish turned to the potato, a crop that could be grown abundantly in less favorable soil. Eventually, cows took over much of Ireland, leaving the native population virtually dependent on the potato for survival. (from Wikipedia)"

Much of the land previously dedicated to traditional crops beans, barley, rye and oats had been turned into potato fields and resulted in a monoculture.

That Ireland remained a net exporter of food during the 5 year blight when 1.5 million died of starvation is evidence that famines are primarily political inventions.

In an earlier famine 1782-1783, Irish ports were actually closed to prevent export of food. Because of this food prices dropped and the poor felt some relief. Merchants lobbied bitterly against this and so in the 1840's potato famine ports were open and grain, beef, pork and other foods were exported to England while the Irish starved to death.
(Read Christine Kinealy, The Irish Famine: This Great Calamity )

The biological cause of crop failure in the Irish famine was caused by late blight, from Central Mexico. Infected potatoes were inadvertantly carried aboard ships from the U.S. to Belgium, England and Ireland and the blight spread by wind borne spores. The disease quickly spread and decimated crops which were genetically very similar and had developed no resistance.

The Inca and other indigenous peoples have cultivated over 300 varieties of potatoes in Peru and Chile. To this day they have never experienced a wide spread crop failure, such as the Irish famine, because there is sufficient genetic diversity among species to successfully adapt to new pathogens and environmental changes.

I believe the key to food security is preserving species diversity, traditional knowledge about cultivation, and fertile lands for agriculture - not GMO's.

There are simply too many irreversible mistakes we could make with GMO's that would have far reaching effects on our food supply and environment. Also, GMO's are items of commerce - patented life forms. GMO's put control of the world's food supply in the hands of a few private corporations in a way that has never before been conceiveable. The "terminator" or "suicide seed" that prevents production of viable seeds in GMO crops makes me think of the starving Irish watching ships laden with food leaving their ports.

The underlying causes of famine are always political - and so are GMO's.

Final thought: our lifestyles NEED to change.
We need to redefine our idea of a good "standard of living".
What we have been doing is not "sustainable" for our ag land, our environment and the people living on the rest of the planet.

Aloha,
Mitzi
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Damon
Punatic

3738 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  15:04:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Richard,

Question - I'm holding in my hand one of your Pints of Grape Tomatoes, Is this pint recyclable? I don't see the Recycling Emblem on it.

Or am I just not seeing it somewhere?

If it's not... any chance you will be moving towards a more environmentally friendly container?



-------
Just a piece of my thinking
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kani-lehua
Punatic

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  15:23:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Richard Ha

Aloha Kani-Lehua;
You are registered on the E Malama 'Aina website.
Mahalo



mahalo for the verificaion.

it seems that biotechnology is here to stay. MONSANTO HAWAI'I entered into a 99 year land lease for long-term agriculture on moloka'i in 2007. just recently, they acquired land in kunia, o'ahu and have other operations in kihei, hanapepe, haleiwa and lahaina.

as quoted from their website:

"Are most of the fruits and vegetables I eat biotech plants?
No. The most commonly grown biotech crops today are corn, soybeans, cotton and canola. Many of these crops are processed into oils commonly used in a wide variety of food products, or into animal feed."

"In Hawaii, some growers raise a variety of papaya that was developed with the help of biotechnology after the papaya ring spot virus threatened to devastate the Hawaiian papaya industry."

i'm not sure how safe gmos are, but do know that i've eaten the rainbow papaya--the variety that is referred to in their statement.

"chaos reigns within.
reflect, repent and reboot.
order shall return."

microsoft error message with haiku poetry

Edited by - kani-lehua on 09/21/2008 15:41:05
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Richard Ha
malihini

USA
86 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2008 :  15:53:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is an excellent question Damon. We are thinking of ways to get away from "over packaging". We are looking into a netted bag to replace that plastic clamshell.

We did move away from clamshell packaging for our lettuce. Instead we use a thin plastic sleeve, like flowers come in. We can squeeze more product into a box and customers find this allows them more usable refrigerator space.

We mentioned to Foodland Supermerkets that we were very interested in avoiding plastic packaging costs. And, we wanted to take advantage of any opportunity we could.

Wholefoods just opened their first store in Hawaii a couple of weeks ago. They buy and sell in bulk quite frequently. Hopefully this can influence other supermarkets.
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