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Hunt Stoddard
Da Kine

386 Posts

Posted - 11/11/2017 :  22:33:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone have opinions on the various home package offerings from HPM, Argus, Honsador, and whoever else does them?

I have noticed the Argus packages are cheaper but provide less than HPM. Basically they are house shells. You don't get drywall, exterior doors, flooring (other than plywood subfloor). And of course, no electrical, plumbing or fixtures.

Honsador seems to have a pretty polished selection, but I haven't had a chance to get a price list.

I'm planning on doing owner/builder and going with post and pier. One question I have in particular is how to get the trusses up. I'm assuming you have to hire a crane or something. Trusses for a 3br 2ba house must weigh a few hundred pounds each.

Mangosteen
Newbie

USA
43 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2017 :  07:49:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Check out Castle Block package homes.

http://castleblock.com/Affordable_Housing/faq.html

No wood, no termites.

Love mine.
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Seeb
Punatic

1842 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2017 :  15:23:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HPM is pretty full service if youíre going frame. If you havenít set trusses get someone to do it for you - there are too many opportunities for disaster.
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Susan
Da Kine

USA
399 Posts

Posted - 11/23/2017 :  16:15:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We are owner builders with a package from Argus. The building went up super fast. Itís all the stuff after ward that takes so long. We are almost two years into it and close to being finished.
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Hunt Stoddard
Da Kine

386 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2017 :  18:22:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Were you satisfied with the quality of materials they provide?
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Susan
Da Kine

USA
399 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2017 :  13:02:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes for the most part. There were a couple of boards interior framing that i would have asked to be replaced had i seen them before they went up. We are about to start a second building. I will tell Argus and my builder to make sure that doesnít happen again. Over all very pleased. Working with Argus was one of the easier parts of getting this house up.
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laurarice
malihini

USA
55 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2017 :  19:19:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I bought one from Pan Abode. They have been on island for about 30 years and have a good reputation.
The local sales person is very responsive and organized. I highly recommend this one. You can start with a basic design and modify it so that it no longer looks"kit" too.

Laura
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laurarice
malihini

USA
55 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2018 :  07:22:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I bought from Panabode cedar homes which has a local representative who has been here for years and has an excellent reputation.
I have heard no bad reports about them at all.

Laura
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Malapuaao
Da Kine

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2018 :  15:16:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Related to this post is the foundation question: slab vs pier. Puna is persistently wet and it takes it toll on wood, especially pier posts.

Those of you with slab foundations, do you like it in rainy season?

Being higher up catches the breeze and keeps away bugs and mold, but 4x4 pier posts end up rotting out fast.

aloha
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Tink
Punatic

USA
1465 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2018 :  17:19:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Slab is easier to get through plan check if they decide that day to enforce seismic loads, but a post of 12 inch diameter concrete with beam saddles on top for wood the rest of the way up work very well to have the wood above "splash" level, and have a bit more seismic/weight strength than wood. To at least tempt them to plan check it without "Engineering".
2 piece rebar 2 inches inside of the cardboard tube from Home Depot with a Simpson saddle and go.

Community begins with Aloha
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Alpogi8
Newbie

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2018 :  12:55:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mangosteen

Check out Castle Block package homes.

http://castleblock.com/Affordable_Housing/faq.html

No wood, no termites.

Love mine.



Interested to check this house design. Anyone willing to show me his/her home and possibly give me some advise? Iím in HPP for the next 6 days. Thanks
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Alpogi8
Newbie

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2018 :  12:58:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Call me at 808-315-8087
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Hunt Stoddard
Da Kine

386 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2018 :  23:55:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tink

Slab is easier to get through plan check if they decide that day to enforce seismic loads, but a post of 12 inch diameter concrete with beam saddles on top for wood the rest of the way up work very well to have the wood above "splash" level, and have a bit more seismic/weight strength than wood. To at least tempt them to plan check it without "Engineering".
2 piece rebar 2 inches inside of the cardboard tube from Home Depot with a Simpson saddle and go.

Community begins with Aloha



I'll be going post and pier. My thoughts on this are: first, current building dept guidelines don't seem to allow many single piers with 4x4 posts, though I'm far from clear on this. Seems like they're moving toward having several shear walls with beams between them. The walls will be covered with t1-11. What posts <i>are</i> exposed should be CU treated and then primed/painted. I can't imagine they would get enough weather to rot easily, especially if you have a 4' eave overhang.

Concrete is expensive, especially here in HI. Concrete piers are great, but will cost you. Are they worth the extra expense and effort? I'm not sure. (In fact, I'm not sure about all the above :))
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birdmove
Punatic

USA
1235 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2018 :  18:24:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think post and pier, in the long run, is best. Up off the ground is good, and easier access to water lines and such.

Jon in Keaau/HPP
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Hotzcatz
Punatic

USA
1780 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2018 :  08:07:00  Show Profile  Visit Hotzcatz's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Part of it depends where on the island you're building. They're now checking wind loads, seismic zones and requiring engineering on plans up along the Hamakua coast areas.

They seem to want all the piers connected with concrete beams (stringers?) now. At least, up along the Hamakua Coast, it may be different in Puna due to the lack of soil there. In any case, the piers are tied together with 12" x 12" concrete 'beams' and I forget the size and quantity of rebar at the moment, but the rebar is in there. Concrete has almost zero tensile strength so there'd have to be rebar.

There is now a lot of requirements for braced walls which includes the post and pier part of the house, too. For bracing requirements, the post and pier level of a house is considered as one floor level of the house so it would have the same bracing requirements as the first floor. And the braced walls are required each way every so many feet, twenty four? Twenty six? Twenty eight? and for a certain percentage of the length. It may be 55% of the first floor walls. Which pretty much knocks the 'traditional' post and pier methods out of the water.

So, for a post and beam house, the corners are minimum 4' x 4' braced walls, also 55% of the perimeter is now a braced wall instead of just posts. Under the braced wall there is about double the amount of concrete that there used to be and a lot more Simpson fittings than there used to be.

As for getting the trusses up, a lot of it depends on the individual construction. I've had them delivered to the top of the walls, but that was a slab on grade house. If it's one story on piers, usually one end of the trusses will reach the top of the walls so they are never fully lifted, more tilted and slid than lifted. There is the crane truck option as well for higher houses.


"I like yard sales," he said. "All true survivalists like yard sales."
Kurt Wilson

Edited by - Hotzcatz on 04/27/2018 08:07:27
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HI_Someday
Da Kine

USA
212 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2018 :  08:25:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our preferred plan when/if we are able move to the Big Island was to buy a few acres and build, likely on tbe Hamakua coast. After following the forums for a few years, and reading Hotcatz' post above, it now seems highly unlikely we'll be able to build (both financial and timeframe reasons).
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