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 Man With Broken Leg Rescued From Mauna Kea Summit
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kalakoa
Motormouth

11958 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  12:38:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
https://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2019/06/11/man-with-broken-leg-rescued-from-mauna-kea-summit/

There must be some desecration in there somewhere.

terracore
Punatic

5700 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  16:06:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Personnel were rotated as needed. Due to the lack of Oxygen, personnel could only carry the patient for approximately 10' at a time before stopping to catch their breath. It took approximately 3.5 hours to navigate the 1 mile distance and 700' elevation gain while carrying the patient. Rescuers worked tirelessly despite the cold temperatures and altitude sickness."

That sounds horrible. I wonder why our rescuers can't have proper mountaineering gear including oxygen.

ETA: formatting

Edited by - terracore on 06/11/2019 16:07:16
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MarkD
Punatic

1161 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  18:30:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Amazing how people, primarily tourists and recent mainland arrivals, regularly injure themselves in some of our wild places that lack serious danger, comparatively.

Oahu's mountains, filled with razor back ridges and sheer, unstable slopes, are highly prone to fatal falls.

Mauna Kea's slopes are not that steep. And they are not obscured by vegetation--a major factor in Oahu and Maui cliff falls.

Any day now we'll have a tourist drown in 3 feet of water. Time for another tax on tourists: Wildland use.
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hilodiver
malihini

USA
70 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  18:43:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think they meant 10 minutes, not 10 feet! Altitude is a huge factor up there, especially when you don't have time to acclimatise. The terrain off the trail is very rocky and there are huge ravines. This kind of incident happens several times a year. Unfortunately, the rescue helicopters don't have enough lift at that altitude. Best to be safe and stay on the trails!

Aloha!
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8071 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  21:20:20  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
hilodiver - I suspect you are correct, ten seconds is just enough time to lift a patient in a stretcher and put them down again! As for how dangerous hiking on Mauna Kea is, well, I don't know the exact location of the incident, but if the hiker was on cinder that stuff can be particularly nasty as I found out myself many years ago when walking between observatories - managed to shred my knee.

The rescuers did a great job, thank you PTA staff and the Mauna Kea rangers. As for the suggestion that they might carry supplemental oxygen, I don't think that's a bad idea at all.
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Pilgrim
Da Kine

255 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  22:25:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe if they start charging tourists for rescues they could afford the proper gear.
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8071 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2019 :  22:33:54  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
It's not only tourists that need rescuing from the mountain.
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Obie
Punatic

USA
3625 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2019 :  05:30:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They had to haul him up a 40 degree incline.

“It’s about one or two miles from the observatories,” Donnelly said. “They find the guy, splint the leg, put him in a rigid Stokes litter, and then they’ve got to haul the guy about two miles. It was a 40-degree incline. It took them four hours to get them back to” a waiting county ambulance."
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leilanidude
Punatic

USA
3586 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2019 :  05:56:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wonder why they didn't utilize a Blackhawk helicopter which has the ability to take-off and land as well as hover at much higher altitudes than that.
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randomq
Punatic

USA
1592 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2019 :  07:20:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We just need to hire some Tibetan rangers!

So who was this guy? Tourist, practitioner, local, staff?
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SBH
Kamaaina

USA
980 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2019 :  07:49:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It wasn’t just a broken leg, the rescue cost an arm and a leg.
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alaskyn66
Punatic

1540 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2019 :  08:35:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by randomq

Who was this guy? Tourist, practitioner, local, staff?



68 year old man from Arizona, I would guess tourist.
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8071 Posts

Posted - 06/13/2019 :  20:41:13  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Latest from KHON2:

https://www.khon2.com/news/local-news/high-altitude-and-dangerous-conditions-made-monday-s-rescue-on-mauna-kea-challenging/2072986642

"All he had on was some shoes, pair of shorts and a windbreaker jacket. So because of how cold it was he was really grateful when we got there. He was shivering...he wasn't really prepared for it for sure."

Incidentally, they're still sticking with the stopping every 10 feet claim, which I still find a little dubious, but if that is really true, then supplemental O2 really is needed by rescuers.
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terracore
Punatic

5700 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2019 :  17:06:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe he was an extraordinarily large man? Even at sea level a huge amount of weight is exhausting to carry.
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8071 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2019 :  21:50:41  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Let's say he had to be taken on a stretcher for a mile. Stopping every 10 feet, well, let's say that takes 20 seconds each time and that's generous. One mile at 20 seconds per 10 feet would mean that it would have taken about a week to take the casualty to safety.
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KeaauRich
Punatic

1190 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2019 :  01:37:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I don't claim to be a math whiz, but if there are 5280 feet in a mile, that means there were 528 10 foot segments. If we use Tom's 20 seconds per segment allotment, doesn't that mean the one mile trip took 528 x 20= 10,560 seconds? There are 3,600 seconds in an hour, so the trip would have taken 2.9 hours (10,560/3600=2.9), which is pretty much in line with the published reports. It may have seemed like a week to those doing the lifting however...

Edited by - KeaauRich on 06/15/2019 01:38:46
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