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nana valley
Kamaaina

564 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  14:15:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Put Nanawale on your list too. Unless you are looking for larger lots. Leilani has 1 ac.lots but they are lava zone 1 for insurance.
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John A
Newbie

2 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  14:57:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We live in HPP and are very happy, but be very careful as to your neighbors. Quite a mixture of very classy places and cock farms. A friend lives in Ainaloa, hates it. Very high crime and a lot of county housing. I love Leilani, but check out what homeowners insurance will cost in that lava zone... could be over $300 per month.
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KathyH
Punatic

USA
3784 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  15:34:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by John A

We live in HPP and are very happy, but be very careful as to your neighbors. Quite a mixture of very classy places and cock farms. A friend lives in Ainaloa, hates it. Very high crime and a lot of county housing. I love Leilani, but check out what homeowners insurance will cost in that lava zone... could be over $300 per month.

yeah, the County housing part is something I didn't want to say first, but as it's been said ...

There are only certain areas where landlords have for a long time taken Section 8, and in these areas you have clumps of households that have a certain mentality. I don't think Section 8 is a bad concept, but in practice it has worked out that way. Landlords who care about their property won't take it, mostly only slumlords. And once you get it established, you don't move away from it or you could lose it.

I have always heard that Ainaloa and Hawaiian Beaches were two subdivisions where you get this. I thought it was Nanawale too, but no one here seems to think so. The subdivisions with houses on small lots that have built on longer are more likely to have this issue. Anyway, Ainaloa has it for sure.

Another thing with buying cheap property -- ou may find a place with good neighbors, but as long as it is cheap property in Puna, your area is always going to be number one choice for drug labs and dealers and growers and people on the fringe. It will also be the choice of people who want to live simple non-materialistic lifestyles ... usually these are excellent neighbors. So you will have both.

Neighbors move. They change jobs, they die, they have parents die and have to move to take care of things, they get fed up ... and you are completely not able to control who is going to move in next.

Not to say that there can't be truly sucky neighbors in more expensive neighborhoods, but they will usually suck in different ways.

You cannot possibly get a handle on all the pitfalls by doing drive throughs and tours. You really do need to live here and spend some time getting to know the place, or you are depending on having very good luck in your choice.

You can't avoid stuff like rooster farms by screening the neighbors either. Someone can always put one in after you arrive, as long as zoning and CC&R's allow. Same with dogs and packs of dogs.

My neighbors who moved this year did not have a pig sty when we bought the place. They just decided to raise pigs at some point, which were constantly making high-pitched squeals, and it was pretty annoying to live with. They could have gotten roosters too; we were just lucky they didn't want to. Now the penned pigs are gone with those neighbors, but who knows what is to come? It's ag land, people farm; people hunt; the culture is into cock-fighting too.

btw, I certainly never said a word to my neighbors about the pigs being annoying ...
Then I would have had both pig noise and neighbors that were upset at me, and I preferred having good relations. Actually I got used to the squealing; it's when a noise is new that you hear it ... the coquis don't bother me any more either.

Bottom line, if you buy ag land, best to embrace the sounds and smells of farming. If you don't want that, find some residential zoning or some enforced CC&R's.

Good luck!
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PaulW
Punatic

2389 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  15:41:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Land is so cheap these days, you could seriously consider buying the vacant lots either side to avoid bad neighbors.
Good investment for the future too. There have been a few multi-lot purchases recently, I wonder if that's what they were thinking.
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Radiopeg
Kamaaina

USA
566 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2012 :  09:42:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I, too, live in Eden Roc. I was getting my dander up about a new junk yard on Palainui, when we found out that it is the result of a clean-up campaign and will be cleared out. So, that said, I have good neighbors and no problems. The closest "homemade" houses are inhabited by nice people. We live next to a lot many would consider ugly, but the owner and his friends are hardworking individuals. You can't get a whole street that is all of one thing or another. Things change, but I am very comfortable here after a year. I'm still waiting on the sale of my WA house so I can buy a real house (currently in a fully equipped RV). There are a couple of houses for sale in here I would be happy to purchase. Peggy

Peace and long life
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terracore
Kamaaina

988 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2012 :  12:00:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Radiopeg

I, too, live in Eden Roc. I was getting my dander up about a new junk yard on Palainui, when we found out that it is the result of a clean-up campaign and will be cleared out. So, that said, I have good neighbors and no problems. The closest "homemade" houses are inhabited by nice people. We live next to a lot many would consider ugly, but the owner and his friends are hardworking individuals. You can't get a whole street that is all of one thing or another. Things change, but I am very comfortable here after a year. I'm still waiting on the sale of my WA house so I can buy a real house (currently in a fully equipped RV). There are a couple of houses for sale in here I would be happy to purchase. Peggy

Peace and long life




Did you bring the RV with you or did you buy it in Hawaii?
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Radiopeg
Kamaaina

USA
566 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2012 :  19:45:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Craigs list. Cheaper than the shipping.

Peace and long life
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DoryGray
Da Kine

USA
439 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2012 :  13:02:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've bought & sold many properties in CT, NC, FL & HI & have a policy of extreme due diligence before buying. One of the best is not just driving the neighborhood, but going to the property & spending time there on a Fri or Sat night. It's worked for me, I've never really had problem neighbors; probably luck I guess too.
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Orchidlandguy
Da Kine

340 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2012 :  17:03:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ainaloa has some crime statistics available from Keaau Police station. I live in Orchidland and own some property in HPP.
I would not live in Leilani or Naniwale due to the lava zone ratings which raise insurance costs.
HPP is safer the closer you get to the water. Very active neighborhood watch groups in HPP. Orchidland safety depends on your neighbors. I have 3 square acres and house in middle. Neighbors and myself have been here a long time and are stable. Behind me there are tarps and folks living off the land without clean water or real shelter.
I have in-laws in Ainaloa and they hate it. Lots of crime according to them. Break ins and drug sales. But the police would have the crime map to show you.

Edited by - Orchidlandguy on 04/09/2012 17:04:51
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VancouverIslander
Da Kine

Canada
222 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  10:36:10  Show Profile  Visit VancouverIslander's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, the Ainaloa property appears to have been sold before we got a bid in. It's two fully permitted studios raised to have carports and storage space below. Bank owned. It was listed by a Maui agent who was hard to get ahold of and he'd listed it on gohoming.com, which is apparently where the offer came from. The asking price dropped to 75k a day or two before we looked at it and it's still not listed as contingent on MLS, but apparently there's a "contract". From my limited knowledge, I think Ainaloa has two very distinct areas - the side that's more paved, and the part that has poorly maintained dirt roads. The latter is the part I'd stay away from, though I talked to nice folks there.

So we're on to Eden Roc for now. We've put in an initial bid and will wait to see if it's countered. The place is unpermitted but we intend to bring it up to the most recent code, despite the extra expense, we feel it is important. It's got poles out front with telephone and power comes to within 2 poles (the nearest neighbor). We will not be spending money we can't afford to lose, it would just delay retirement a bit. Although I'm a high school teacher and we lived on a single income most of our lives, we have always had excellent money management and can afford to take chances. We've always worked hard and payed off our debts before spending on frivolities like vacations and unpermitted houses 2300 miles away =)

Our RE agent lives a couple of blocks away and has been there for almost 30 years. He says when he first moved there was the only time he has a problem with someone breaking in (kids - didn't cost him too much). I am quite happy with the anecdotal evidence folks have provided here. If my worst problem is roosters, coqui frogs, pigs, goats, what have you, I'll be happy, especially since we've run a horse boarding operation, had chickens, goats, a donkey and more in the past. If we get this place we'll keep an eye out for a chance to buy up the adjacent lots in the future.

It's hard to get time to post or even think a lot about things while on a combined vacation/real estate hunt. Thanks to everyone who posted so far and I'll catch up when I get back to the Island I grew up on.
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kani-lehua
Punatic

USA
1251 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  11:34:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"There are only certain areas where landlords have for a long time taken Section 8, and in these areas you have clumps of households that have a certain mentality. I don't think Section 8 is a bad concept, but in practice it has worked out that way. Landlords who care about their property won't take it, mostly only slumlords. And once you get it established, you don't move away from it or you could lose it."

Our beautiful home in Fern Forest is still available for rent. We take pride in our homes and are definitely NOT slumlords. Section8 Housing welcome.

It is the duty of the owner/landlord to screen ALL potential tentants and to conduct inspections periodically.



"a great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices."

w. james

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KathyH
Punatic

USA
3784 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  12:43:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
kani,
I give you big props for renting out your property taking Section 8. Many landlords with affordable housing just put No Section 8 in the ad. I apologize for over-generalizing. I am definitely pro affordable housing.

However, in spite of you being one of the good ones, there certainly is a Section 8/slumlord dynamic present in parts of the island, that has been around a long time. There are inspections required to keep basics going, but people (in general) don't improve rental properties when the cash flow can't go up when they do, and they keep repairs as minimal as they can.

But I'm not talking about run down properties, more the mentality that goes along with the long term welfare culture (in general, always exceptions); I'm talking about pockets where the families can get County housing but they are still broke and they turn to dealing drugs for extra cash. Or they do drugs and drink heavily because their lives aren't going anywhere. And families are beating on each other.

kani, you might find this article interesting as you have a place to rent and aren't getting the applicants. It appears the last time people on the wait list were given vouchers was five years ago. The waiting list is huge.
http://www.westhawaiitoday.com/sections/news/local-news/6k-waiting-housing-aid.html

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rusty h
Da Kine

408 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  15:12:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
do banks lend to unpermitted homes?
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terracore
Kamaaina

988 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  15:17:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rusty h

do banks lend to unpermitted homes?



No, but a few banks do lend on "vacant land". Interest rate is about 3x time for a property with permitted structure though.
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rusty h
Da Kine

408 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2012 :  15:22:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks, i didnt thank so
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